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April 19, 2012

Video: Using MapReduce to Query a NoSQL Database

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Just because you’re using a NoSQL database doesn’t mean you can’t do queries.  In this video excerpt from Andrew Brust’s course NoSQL:  The Big Picture you’ll see how the MapReduce model works and how it applies to NoSQL databases.  In the full course Andrew covers other key topics such as consistency and compromise, document stores and graph databases, and databases in the cloud.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPATE6BBIQs]

Andrew is Founder and CEO of Blue Badge Insights, an analysis, strategy and advisory firm serving Microsoft customers and partners. Brust is also a Microsoft Regional Director and MVP; an advisor to the New York Technology Council; and co-author of the forthcoming “Programming Microsoft SQL Server 2012.” Brust is Co-Chair of Visual Studio Live!, a frequent speaker at industry events and a columnist for Visual Studio Magazine.

If you’d like to learn more about what NoSQL really means, you should check out this course now.

You can watch the full HD version of this video along with the other 1 hrs 10 min of video found in this professional course by subscribing to Pluralsight. Visit NoSQL:  The Big Picture to view the full course outline. Pluralsight subscribers also benefit from cool features like mobile appsfull library searchprogress trackingexercise filesassessments, and offline viewing. Happy learning!

About the Author

is a Chief Architect specializing in large scale distributed system development and enterprise software processes. Paul has more than twenty years of development experience including being a former Microsoft MVP, a speaker at technical conferences such as Microsoft Tech-Ed and VSLive, and a published author. Prior to working on the Windows platform, he built software using a vast array of technologies including Java, Unix, C, and even OS/2.


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