SharePoint Services Part 3: Learn to Create a New Wiki
Pluralsight blog Where devs, IT admins & creative pros go for news, tips, videos and more.
3,500+ tech & creative courses authored by experts - unlimited & online Get it now →
November 2, 2007

SharePoint Services Part 3: Learn to Create a New Wiki

By

Today’s article is the third and final one in the series on SharePoint Services, and will cover the steps in creating a new wiki in SharePoint. SharePoint Services Part 2 went over the steps to creating a new custom list and Part 1 focused on creating a new child site in SharePoint.

If you missed the previous articles, I would suggest reading them first to make sure you’re not missing any important information and that you understand the whole process from start to finish.

Parts 1 and 2 are available here:

Today we’re shifting our focus to the third and final objective: Creating a new wiki to use for a knowledge base. I’ll show you the easy steps to creating a new wiki that can be used as a great tool for storing information, enabling team collaboration, and more!

Creating a Wiki Library

Wikis are document libraries with which documents can be quickly created and edited within the SharePoint site. “Wiki” is the Hawaiian term for quick, and the goal of a wiki in SharePoint is to provide an unstructured environment that encourages collaboration and enables everyone to participate.

Going back to our IT department example, the wiki library will serve as a knowledge base for the department. So let’s get started!

  1. From the SharePoint site where the wiki is to be created, click the Create link from the Site Actions menu.


  2. SharePoint Wiki - 1

  3. From the Create page, click the Wiki Page Library link under the Libraries category.


  4. SharePoint Wiki - 2

  5. From the New page enter a title and description for the wiki, select whether or not to display the wiki in the Quick Launch then click the Create button.


  6. SharePoint Wiki - 3

When a new wiki library has been created, it will automatically be populated with two pages that explain the purpose and usage of a wiki library.

SharePoint Wiki - 4

Wikis are ideal for hosting a knowledge base from a SharePoint site since the content can be searchable from the site.

Wiki pages can also easily link to other Wiki pages by simply enclosing the title of the page you wish to link to within two sets of brackets, for example [[Wiki Page]].

SharePoint Wiki - 5

If you create a link in a wiki page to a page that does not exist, the link will have a dotted underline which when clicked, will automatically create a new wiki page with the link’s title.

SharePoint Wiki - 6

Let’s take a look at a finished wiki page. Notice, you can add text, images, links and more — just like in any old document.

SharePoint Wiki - 7

After you enter your information, this is what others in your team will see and will be able to add on to it and edit it:

SharePoint Wiki - 8

Wait! That’s Not All …

The examples in this article show just a portion of the capabilities of a SharePoint site. SharePoint has many other features that can be useful for an IT department or any other team within an organization. While the additional features offer their own usage and functionality, the creation of many of those features follows a lot of the same conventions as those explained in this series of articles.


Get all articles directly! Subscribe to Train Signal Training today!

Learn More about SharePoint with Train Signal’s SharePoint Server 2007 Training Videos!


SharePoint Server 2007 Training

Our SharePoint training covers both: SharePoint Services 3.0 (WSS 3.0) and SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS 2007).

This instructor led video training also prepares you for the Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 Configuration Exam (70-630 MCTS) and the Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 Configuration Exam (70-631 MCTS).

With over 15 hours of video, our SharePoint training is your comprehensive guide to simplifying your organization’s collaboration and communication efforts.

Learn more and view the free demo here!

About the Author

(A+) is experienced in both IT and development. He has completed training in computers, electronics and networking and obtained his A+ certification. Jason is a self-taught developer and over half of his career in technology has been in web and Windows development, while the rest has been IT orientated. He hopes to be able to use his cross industry expertise to be able to shed more light on the exciting life of a developer for those in IT considering making the move to software. Jason has written articles on various topics including SharePoint, CompTIA A+, and Windows Server 2008.


Discussion